Ménage à Trois Puffs

1 05 2010

Yes, you did read correctly and no, this is not a post about Brian Boitano, Ryan Seacrest and Tyler Florence. It is about food, more food and me. It is a commentary that maybe I am slipping a bit, giving into those urges under time pressures and other excuses for weakness: I broke down and bought some pre-made puff pastry shells. I am a whore to culinary convenience.

There.

Happy?

It’s out in the open now like the screaming love child of John Edwards. But if I’m going down, let’s make it a worthwhile trip, let’s live the fantasy: let’s have a culinary ménage à trois. And no, that does not mean three episodes of Rachel Ray’s shows in a row. I said culinary. So look past the box, if you can, and don’t be a “flavor hater.” Focus on the pleasure prize: tender tasty escargot rubbing whatever substitutes for elbows on a mollusk with a perfectly sautéed duxelle both astride a meticulously seared bit of foie gras torchon; all together cloaked under a rich garlicky wine and cream sauce tucked away from the prying  paparazzi in a puff pastry shell. As those sages from Liverpool remarked, “All you need is love, love, love…Love is all you need.” Then you get sent to Rehab.

  • 6 Puff pastry shells ( 1 box of frozen puff pastry shells usually has 6)
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tsp water added
  • Foie gras ~3-4oz (4, ½ inch slices if using torchon)
  • Escargot, 1 can (4.4 oz dry weight)
  • Duxelle
    • 1 Tbs butter
    • 1 Tsp oil
    • 4 shallots, minced finely (and divided into 1/3 and reserve  2/3)
    • 4 clove garlic, minced finely (divided into ½ and reserve ½ )
    • 4 oz finely minced baby bella mushrooms
    • ¼ cup fresh flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
  • Sauce
    • Reserved fat from cooking foie gras
    • Reserved shallot and garlic
    • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
    • 1 cup chicken stock
    • ½ cup white wine
    • ¼ cup cream

Slice foie gras into ½ inch slices and brown in a very hot pan over high heat. Reserve the fat rendered from cooking. Remove slices and allow to cool then cut into 6 even pieces. For the duxelle, heat the oil and butter in a sauté pan over medium heat and cook 1/3 of the shallots until translucent, about 2-3 minutes. Add ½ of the garlic and cook 1 more minute. Add the mushrooms, season and cook until almost all the liquid has reduced. Remove from the heat, cool and combine with the parsley, seasoning as needed.

Prepare the shells according to directions. Lightly coat the top of the shells with the egg wash mixture. Bake according to directions. Divide the escargot, foie gras and duxelle into 6 portions. Place the escargot, foie gras and mushroom mixture into each shell.

While the puffs are baking, prepare the sauce. Sauté the remaining shallots in the rendered foie gras until soft; add the garlic and thyme and cook another minute. Add the stock and wine; reduce until only about 25% of the original volume is left. Add the cream and allow the sauce to thicken, until it coats the back of a spoon. Season, remove and top the puffs with the sauce. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and thyme.

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6 responses

1 05 2010
tasteofbeirut

Hey you crack me up once again! Ménage a trois puffs! What a title! I forgive you the frozen horror of commercial puff pastry because of the distinguished guests of your puffy little house! Wow! That is la grande cuisine, no less!
Now I will stop by my neighborhood grocery store and get me some foie gras and escargots, presto!

1 05 2010
whatscookingwithdoc

J: Thanks for forgiving the tresspasses. It works even better for breakfast with an egg on top!

1 05 2010
BB

This is super. Don’t despair the occassional convenience food. There are some that are quite good, and who has time to make puff pastry from scratch? I know one living person who makes puff pasrty from scratch, and he’s verrrrry old.

Looks fabulous, and I’ll be working on this recipe very soon!

1 05 2010
whatscookingwithdoc

BB: Share your tweaks to it! BTW, how old is the guy who rolls his own…?

2 05 2010
Chef E

🙂 Hey, where the heck can you get good wine in Georgia? Without making it ourselves, lol…yeah we are having a bit of trouble finding good food and wine, or even being able to bring it into a non-license restaurant. No alcohol with-in 75 feet of a church my arse…we are dieing over here, lol!

Adrienne is saying “Thank goodness for bad wine, so we remember what good wine is like”!

I love this post, love it Doc! Your humor is very compatible with mine…

2 05 2010
whatscookingwithdoc

Chef E: If you are outside of the Atl it can be tough. Now you know the depths of the pain I experienced (and why I joined a lot of wine clubs!).
BTW, we intepret the 75 foot rule to mean you have to have it drunk by then (or it turns back into water).

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